How do I manage my levels with Depression?

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How do I manage my levels with Depression?

Question:

Hi DiabetesSisters,

My name is Renu and I live in Austria.  I am 23 years old, married and have been diagnosed with diabetes.  My levels are more than 250 and I am very much depressed, because my levels are not coming down with a walk for 30 min every day and proper diet.  I also take 2 tablets suggested by my physician.  I would like to know what I could do to reduce my levels without medication, and how I can overcome the depression stage I am going through right now.  I am not able to concentrate on anything and my life is kind of becoming miserable, which makes it difficult for my husband.  I hope I will get supportive advice from your team.

Thanks and Regards,

R.

 

 

 

Answer:

Hi R,

I understand that you are feeling depressed, for multiple reasons, related to your diabetes. It seems to me that you are depressed: 1- because of your recent diagnosis, 2- because you are active daily and eating healthy, but not seeing any changes yet in your blood sugar levels, 3- because you don't want to take medication, and 4- because your depressed mood is interfering with your marital relationship. There is no ONE answer to improve your depression when you have many factors contributing to your mood. What you can try to change are some of your thoughts and your actions that contribute to your depressed mood.

Common emotional reactions to being diagnosed with diabetes are depression, denial, anxiety, anger and frustration, etc. It's hard to say what thoughts are going on in your head, since I don't know you, but it would help you, if you could identify your thoughts regarding your diagnosis.  Are you feeling vulnerable and worried about future complications?  Are you angry at the changes in your life that diabetes management requires? I already know that you feel frustrated with the lack of progress  which diet and exercise have had. I would suggest talking to your health care professional, a diabetes educator, and/or a mental health professional so you can sort out your feelings. (For example - if you're worried about the future, try to deal with your diabetes one day at a time. We don't know what the future will be, so try to stay focused on the here and now.)

I would like to encourage you to continue with your daily walks and healthy food choices. "Rome wasn't built in a day."  You don't say how long you've been maintaining a healthier lifestyle, but don't give up!

Your idea that you don't want to take medicine needs to be re-examined. High blood sugar levels are commonly associated with feelings of depression. Please discuss with your health care professional how medication can help improve your diabetes management (and your mood!!). Your doctor may need to increase your current dosage, or add a new medication, or both.

Lastly, your diabetes is yours to care for, but your husband is also involved with all the changes that diabetes requires. Please invite him to attend your appointments with your health care professional, so you two can learn together how he can be a support for your new lifestyle, as well.

I wish you good luck as you adjust to your diagnosis of diabetes.

Take care, Dr. Bev