New Recommendations for People with Diabetes regarding Aspirin Therapy

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New Recommendations for People with Diabetes regarding Aspirin Therapy

Hello DiabetesSisters,

I was looking through our diabetes sister’s site to see what questions people have and I noticed that we all may need a review on what is recommended for aspirin therapy and diabetes. The facts I am presenting are the 2014 recommendations from the American Diabetes Association. To read all the Standards of Medical Care including the aspirin recommendations, from the American Diabetes Association for 2014 in slide form go to:

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Below you will find the recommendations from the Standards of Medical Care (2014) for you to review.

Who should Not Consider Aspirin Therapy

1.     

Children, teens and those under the age of 21 years should not consume aspirin due to the possibility of Reye syndrome. (For information on Reyes syndrome, go to http://www.reyessyndrome.org/what.html). It is interesting to note that Reyes syndrome is sometimes misdiagnosed as diabetes.

2.     

In the past aspirin has been recommended for most adults with diabetes to use low dose aspirin. (1) This is NO LONGER RECOMMENDED for everyone.  Aspirin is not generally recommended for women with diabetes under 60 and men under 50 years of age without major CVD risk factors (ask your doctor if this is you). This recommendation was put in place because the potential side effect of bleeding may outweigh potential benefits.

3.     

If there is an aspirin allergy.

Who may Benefit from Aspirin Therapy

Anyone who is considering adding aspirin into their medication profile should ask their doctor if it is for them. The American Diabetes Association recommends the following:

1.     

People with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems should discuss with their medical team taking between 75- 162 mg/day of aspirin to help prevent cardiovascular insults. The recommendations state that most men older (greater than 50 years) and women (greater than 60 years) who have a family history of cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, a history of abnormal blood lipids, albuminuria and/or those who smoke may benefit.

2.     

People with diabetes need to talk about the increased benefits of taking aspirin vs the issue of increased bleeding.

3.     

People with diabetes who are younger than 50 years of age if a woman or 60 years of age if a man with at least one risk factor, need to discuss the benefits of aspirin with their doctor.

4.     

People with diabetes that have a history of cardiovascular disease should discuss with their doctor taking 75-162 mg/day of aspirin to help prevent secondary cardiovascular problems.

Please note that people with diabetes who are allergic to aspirin and who have cardiovascular disease should discuss taking clopidogrel (75 mg/day) with their doctor. The American Diabetes Association recommends dual antiplatelet therapy for up to one year after an acute coronary syndrome. Ask your doctor what is recommended for you.

Make sure you are up to date on clinical recommendations for diabetes as they do change. Have a wonderful holiday season!

1.     

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15690251