Avoiding Lows?

Posts: 0
Hey!



Is anyone else afraid of having a low BG while/after exercising? I've only been injecting for a little under a year, and it's been something that constantly worries me, which usually results in avoiding exercise of any use.



I know I need to exercise, but can't seem to shake this! I positively hate the feeling of being low Id really appreciate any tips!



thanks! :)
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
Exercise, especially when it's particularly strenuous, usually causes your body to use insulin more effectively.

Due to this, you need to accommodate for the exercise and it really does depend on what what you choose to do.

I follow the DAFNE course exercise rules and they (roughly) say that if the exercise is less than 45minutes:

BGs under 7: eat 20-30 grams of carbohydrate
BGs over 7: eat 20-10 grams of carbohydrate
BGs over 10: make no corrections, and just do your exercise.
BGs over 13: best to take the required correction to get your levels down first before exercising.

Exercise over (like a day's biking or something) consider more drastic drops (such as 30%-50% off your meals or even putting your background insulin down).

Unfortunately, this is very much a "per person" thing because everyone reacts differently - to insulin, to exercise... you get the jist. If you can find someone to go into this sort of detail, then great.. I'm sadly someone who only knows the DAFNE guidelines..

Take care and best wishes! I know what you're going through!
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
Thanks for the guidelines lilbuta! As you said, it is what works for you! Some people also adjust their insulin down and/or avoid exercise at the peak of the insulin's action.

Chez, if there is a diabetes education center nearby try making an appointment with them to see if they can make some suggestions that would work for you.

By the way, for those of you who are reading lilbuta's numbers and wondering "What the hey?!", she is from the UK where they measure blood glucose in millimoles per liter (mm/L) where we in the US use milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). An easy way of converting to US values is to multiply the British mm/L by 18. When people in Canada or the UK want to know what we in the US are talking about, they can divide our numbers by 18.

:kiss: :kiss: (one for each of you!)
Laurie P., moderator
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
Oh golly, I forgot all about the conversion thing! Thanks Laurie! :)
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
I have experienced "lows" after exercising. I talked with my Endocrinologists about it and he suggested I cut back on the amount of insulin I give myself at supper. If I normally would give myself 2 units for my meal then I would do 1 &1/2. Then I can do my 45 min. to one hour of walking. I try to do this every day at my supper meal and it does work for me. Exercise brings down your blood glucose very fast so you do have to be careful.
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
pecanpie wrote:
Exercise brings down your blood glucose very fast so you do have to be careful.


This is because your body uses insulin more efficiently when you exercise so dropping the dosage can be something you can consider when preparing for exercise.

Here's a great explanation which may be helpful with explaining what happens when you exercise:

exercise makes your body use this insulin more efficiently and causes muscles to extract more glucose from the blood via insulin.

I suppose one way of looking at it is like blood glucose is people, muscles are a house, and insulin is like a door on a spring. Usually, the people go into the house, the door shuts behind them, so the door has to be reopened every time and slows down how many people (glucose) can get in. More insulin means more doors, meaning more people get in.

When you exercise, your muscles do the equivalent of shouting 'free beer and money for everyone!', people rush through the doors and because so many people are trying to get in, the springs gets stretched, the doors don't close as well as they should, so more people can get in, so you either need fewer doors (less insulin) or more people (more glucose)

You'll note though that either way, you still need the door. Otherwise you've got muscles shouting about free beer and a load of puzzled people left on the street, getting grumpy and causing damage because they can't get inside. So exercise alone cannot be a treatment for people with T1 - although it can work well for certain types of T2.


Quote is DeusXM from this discussion.

Hope this helps? I found this explanation really helpful when I came across it on another diabetes forum. :)
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
This explanation is wonderful!!! Still laughing about the free beer! Thanks for this great post!

Laurie P. Moderator
:woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:
Posted about 6 years ago
Posts: 0
My biggest concern about exercise is that treaded low and how to adjust my pump prior to the workout.  I would rather suspend my pump but my endo feels it is better to lower basal rate.  What do you all think about how to figure out how much to decrease basal rate. 
Posted about 6 years ago
Dew
Posts: 0

I know how you feel. I too am just under a year and really have NOT got used to all this yet. It's so hard!! I get NO, ZERO, NADA exercise at all. Would if I knew how to go about it. I do have some limitations. Shoulder sockets unstable and right knee unstable. No running or jumping or heavy weights.

Posted about 5 months ago
Posts: 0

Well writing, your writing skill is very nice.

Posted about 1 week ago