Type I Diabetes and Marathons

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Hi! I was diagnosed with Type I last October. I have been managing my sugars well and started on the pump 2 months ago. I plan to run the Chicago marathon this October. Are there any Type I's with any advice on completing this? I will be getting a continuous glucose monitor in a month so I know that will help. I have been running all year long so I am not new to exercising with diabetes.

Thanks!
Posted about 9 years ago
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Hi ... I have not run any marathons, but I have found that any kind of excitement + prolonged physical exertion can drop and keep me low for hours. The adrenaline in particular really does a number on my BGs. A marathon is totally do-able, although you will have to test a lot and possibly disconnect from your pump for the whole thing. Be prepared for anything. I just started running this year and it has helped my BGs tremendously. Good luck and keep me posted on how the training is going.
Posted about 9 years ago
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It's been a while since I ran a full-marathon (7 years) and before the cgm, but I did have the pump. Now I'm running halfs. I have found the cgm to be super helpful because I hate having to stop to check my blood sugar. I usually didn't check and just ran with pleny of things to bring up a low or to prevent a low. I always ate something at about every hour... a gel or goo or smarties candy. I had some problems with my sensor falling off during runs because of the sweat and salt factor. (I've found if I put the sensor low on my back/upper buttocks that it stays better because my running pants hold it in place.)

So exciting to complete a marathon. There's nothing quite like that accomplishment!

Let me know if you have any other questions and good luck!!!
~Laura
Posted about 9 years ago
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I'd agree w/ Laura... plenty of fuel to replenish every hour: carbs and salt. Fuel belt would be handy. I'm a half-marathoner, but run very slowly, so I'm on the road a LONG time. :) Being a type 2, I don't need a pump (yet), so I can't comment on placement.

Two things that come to mind:
(1) blisters - be extra vigilant. I've been a Thorlo wearer since I started running (about 2 yrs now), but was recently introduced to Injinji socks. They have been a wonderful relief for my toes - no blisters!

(2) Race day excitement/jitters: always disrupts my sleep the night before and my BG! Plan ahead and adjust accordingly.

Hope this helps! Good luck w/ Chicago...I've got a few friends running it this year. I'm thinking '11 will be my year. ;)

Would love to meet you (a fellow diabetic runner - there aren't many of us that I can find!) via my blog, RunningCirclesAroundTheTurtles.com

Take care,

Robin
Posted about 9 years ago
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Chicago is coming up in just over a week; you must be excited! Please share your experience with us as I'm running my first marathon on November 14 (OBX) and am eager to hear from you if you have any advice. I use Clif shot gels for training runs and find they do a great job of keeping my blood sugar up; of course I haven't yet completed 26.2 miles! Best of luck to you and I can't wait to hear about how it goes.
Posted about 9 years ago
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Thank you for the advice and support! I am very excited for the race in about 10 days. Good luck on the OBX marathon! During my training I have not been wearing the pump when I run and plan not to wear it on race day. I have not gone low during runs and I did this by eating a substantial bowl of Cheerios before each run without bolusing. They don't bother my stomach when I run and it's plenty of carbs for the entire workout. Hope this helps and I'll let you know how the marathon goes.
Posted about 9 years ago
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Hi jlagedrost, and welcome to Forums!


Has anyone tried Mefix to keep their sets/sensors in place? (use alcohol first, let it dry, Mefix on the skin around the edges ..not on top of the injection site)

Do you stay disconnected for more than an hour? Have you had problems with ketones at the end of a run? A friend (a pumper on Team Type 2) of mine thought he could just take off his pump, but found that he always needed a small amount of basal insulin or else he had leg cramps and very high sugars.

OK, maybe I'll take a walk today...feeling guilty. Thank you! You go girls!

Laurie P., Moderator :kiss:
Posted about 9 years ago
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Laurie P.,

So far taking off the pump during runs has not been an issue. The long runs lower my sugar so much that I find I don't need any insulin during them. The marathon will take about 4 hours and I have trained up to 3.5 hours and been fine. I've only had Type 1 for a year however so maybe the affect is different depending on how long the disease has been present?
To be honest it's kind of a pain to run with the pump on my shorts.
Take care <3
Posted about 9 years ago
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Possibly! You may still be in honeymoon and making some of your own insulin.

OK I haven't started walking yet, but I'm THINKING about it....

Laurie P.. Moderator:blush:
Posted about 9 years ago
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Hi all,
I just wanted to let you know that the Chicago Marathon went great. Before the race I ate a big bowl of cheerios without giving any insulin. I then took off my pump for the entire race. I feel so blessed I had no problems with low BG the whole race. It also helped that every few miles they had water and gatorade staions. Every few stations I took the gatorade to keep my sugar up. I didn't have to stop and finished 32nd in my age group! And when I went home and measured BG it was 116..so I would say it worked out pretty well.
You really can do anything and diabetes cannot hold you back as long as you put your mind to it!
Posted about 9 years ago
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WHHHHOOOOTTT!!!!!! Congrats!
Posted about 9 years ago