frustration

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My doctor told me at my diabetes check today that even if I do everything I'm supposed to, I can still have complications such as kidney problems. That is really frustrating. I thought that as long as I did everything I needed to, I wouldn't really have to be worried about falling apart. I would really like to be one of those lucky type 2's who loose a lot of weight and loose all signs of diabetes. I know that is not a "cure", but it would be nice. I'm sure those of you with type 1 don't have too much pity for me because your issues are so much more complicated, but I needed to vent to someone who would understand. My family tries to be supportive, but they can make me feel like I'm making a big thing out of nothing sometimes.
Posted about 11 years ago
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It's overwhelming when you are told that no matter what you do, you aren't going to ever be "well." Type 1 or Type 2.
In the diabetes class I took last summer, one of the things they told us, was that by the time a person with type 2 is diagnosed, they have been "pre-diabetic" for around ten years or undiagnosed for just as long. If your doc bothered to check your fasting levels years ago, you may have been borderline and it wasn't "worth mentioning" because it was still "normal." That's why alot of the military treatment facilities are getting much more strict with "pre-diabetes" guidelines. They figure if they can get people started on treatment early, using a nutrionist, weight loss and regular check ups, they can possibly avoid a future diagnosis. At that class, out of fifteen, I was the ONLY type 1 (and had been one for less than a month). The rest of the class was half prediabetics, type 2's that were newly diagnosed or taking a refresher course and a hand full of spouses as a support person.
Posted about 11 years ago
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I've had my blood sugar checked every year my entire adult life because it runs in my family. I was told a couple of years ago that I was prediabetic and tried to behave myself. The next year, everything was doing well again including my cholesterol which has been a problem for years, but here I am, diabetic. I am fortunate that I have always been so diligent about checking it so it didn't go undiagnosed for years. I guess I still hang onto the idea of being "well" like you said.
Posted about 11 years ago
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The American Association of Endocrinologists recommend an A1c under 6.5 to help avoid complications. This is backed by many studies.

I know this is tough for T2's like us. I never made it with diet and exercise, or while on oral meds. The best A1c I ever had was a 6.9 with orals, and it was hard work! I didn't achieve great control until I started using an insulin pump.

No one can guarantee a lifetime without complications, but we can do what we can to minimize our risks. That doesn't mean no self indulgence, just means planning it in.
Posted about 11 years ago
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I was told the same thing by the first endocriologist I saw. It is such a negative outlook. I just read an article about changing your mindset. Instead of the negative message, think complications happen to people with out of control diabetes. A postive attitude goes a long way.Also a realistic one. Until recently I didn't think of my diabetes as a disease. The day after Thanksgiving I had an extemely high glucose reading and felt horrible. I realized that I had a disease and should treat it as such. That shift in my thinking has resulted in me taking care of myself and looking at food as a "medicine" I need to keep me healthy. I understand how family can be. People without diabetes just can't understand what it is like living with a chronic illness. I am here if you need to vent!
Posted about 11 years ago
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I LOVE your outlook auntrinny! A positive outlook really DOES go a long way....Once upon a time, I looked at the world through the "glass half empty" view. It scares me to think about what blessings I missed out on during that time! I thought I was protecting myself by thinking about the "worst case scenario" but, in reality, there were times when I spent too much time thinking about the "possible" negative outcomes that never even happened!

I look forward to hearing more about your view on life and dealing with diabetes!
Brandy
Posted about 11 years ago